Trying to create a symbol with such opposing qualities was quite demanding. Moreover, from a functional perspective, we had to ensure that the logo mark would work equally well on print, clothing, labels and digital screens.

The Client

An apparel sourcing start up specialising in the production and export of high-end apparel for some of the world’s leading fashion houses.

The company was setup by two partners who had built their careers in the apparel industry in Tiruppur, India’s primary textile manufacturing hub.

The new startup would provide a comprehensive solution for their customers, handling everything from new product development and manufacturing to quality assurance and shipping.

The Brief

The client wanted to create a logo and brand identity that was sophisticated, evocative and memorable while at the same time coming across as trustworhty, reliable and efficient (cost competitive).

The logo mark also had to be highly functional and flexible so that it would be equally effective on their website and emails as well as their packaging and stationery.

The CHALLENGE

Trying to create a symbol with such opposing qualities was quite demanding. Moreover, from a functional perspective, we had to ensure that the logo mark would work equally well on print, clothing, labels and digital screens.

And if this wasn’t enough, it had to be memorable and relevant to the client’s business. This really was asking a lot from a visual symbol.

The RESEARCH

We began by first looking at the various players in the industry, categorising them into two main groups - similar sized companies and industry leaders. The first thing that caught our attention was the overwhelming industry wide trend towards Alphabetical names with simple typographical logo marks such as SNQS, PVH, VF, etc.

While the remaining companies had a problem with names that lacked any cultural relevancy such as Asmara or Li & Fung. This would of course make it easier for our new identity to stand out from the crowd.

The inspiration

After several meetings, questionnaires and conversations we began to get a feel for what the client was trying to create.

We began by listing out the qualities we wanted our logo mark to convey, brainstorming and sketching out several ideas on paper. We also simultaneously, worked on coming up with names for each concept.

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Concept one - drapr

We began by creating a brush styled typographical based logo which was delightfully indulgent and artful while still appearing professional.

As for the name, we picked Drapr, from the old english term, ‘Draper’. Sometimes referred to as cloth merchants, Drapers were an important trade guild during the medieval period and operated cloth wholesale import export businesses.

This concept fit perfectly with the client’s business. And shortening the name to Drapr made it distinctive as well as making life easier when it came to securing a Domain name for their website.

concept two - ARCHR

While sketching out several generic shapes, I began to notice a visual similarity between clothes hangers and recurved bows used in archery.

By combining the shapes, I created a stylistic bow and arrow, replacing the arrow head with a hanger’s hook. Next, I modified the arrow’s fletching’s to hint at a stitching pattern at the bottom part of the logo.

For the typeface I selected Didot, a clean and efficient modernist serif created by frenchman, Firmin Didot in 1784. It is known for its hairline thin serifs and its high contrast giving it a Minimal, Efficient and Modern look.

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Concept THREE - WINDHM

During colonial times, the East Indiamen were the largest merchant ships used by the British to transport tea, spices and cloth.

One of the most notable of these was the East Indiaman - Windham (Windhm). It sailed 6 major voyages around the globe to India and China, was twice captured by the French and recaptured by the British. Defying the trend of those times, the ship was never sunk or wrecked and was eventually sold to the Chilean Government in 1818. It was renamed Lautaro, refitted and heroically went on to help the Chileans win several battles against similarly sized Spanish vessels.

Sketching out several versions of the ship, I realised the resulting graphics, although pleasing to the eye, were too detailed for an effective logo. However, angling the ship at a slant and using incomplete lines to form an impression enabled me to reduce the logo form to its bare essentials.

Following our approach with the previous identities, I shortened the name to ‘Windhm’, using Bodoni, another semi-modern Serif font created by the Italian Typographer, Giambattista Bodoni just after Frenchman Firmin Didot in the late 1790s.

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final Concept - stitch & hue

My ultimate goal with each logo mark is to visually capture the personality of my client’s business in a creative and memorable way.

In this case, the start up’s two most important qualities were their manufacturing expertise and their strong network of business relationships.

The solution was obvious - I incorporated the cross stitch pattern from the Archr logo mark, using it to connect two simple recognisable words - Stich & Hue. We then added a soft gradient to add some flamboyance and personality to the mark.

After trying out several typeface combinations, we finally settled on two type families.

The first one was Hipstelvetica, a quirky typeface created by José Filipe Gomes, based on the classic Helvetica type family created in 1957 by Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger with input from Eduard Hoffmann.

The second alternative was Jaapokki, a modern minimal Sans Serif Typeface created by a Finnish Designer Mikko Nuuttila. The stroke weight matched the thickness of the strokes in our symbol perfectly. Moreover, the S arched gently to line up with the closest stroke. This ensured the two letters and the symbol worked together perfectly.

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The RESULTS

The geometrical characteristic of the logo translated well across media, making it possible to animate it creatively online as well as enabling the client to stitch it into their apparel and print it on their packaging. After reviewing several colour gradient options from a minimalistic grey to a dynamic yellow to orange hue, the client settled on a soft purple to orange gradient. The purple tones create a sense of luxury, depth and creativity while the soft orange tones add a bit of optimism and warmth to the visual.

© KP-DESIGN 2016
Background Image

Trying to create a symbol with such opposing qualities was quite demanding. Moreover, from a functional perspective, we had to ensure that the logo mark would work equally well on print, clothing, labels and digital screens.

The Client

An apparel sourcing start up specialising in the production and export of high-end apparel for some of the world’s leading fashion houses.

The company was setup by two partners who had built their careers in the apparel industry in Tiruppur, India’s primary textile manufacturing hub.

The new startup would provide a comprehensive solution for their customers, handling everything from new product development and manufacturing to quality assurance and shipping.

The Brief

The client wanted to create a logo and brand identity that was sophisticated, evocative and memorable while at the same time coming across as trustworhty, reliable and efficient (cost competitive).

The logo mark also had to be highly functional and flexible so that it would be equally effective on their website and emails as well as their packaging and stationery.

The CHALLENGE

Trying to create a symbol with such opposing qualities was quite demanding. Moreover, from a functional perspective, we had to ensure that the logo mark would work equally well on print, clothing, labels and digital screens.

And if this wasn’t enough, it had to be memorable and relevant to the client’s business. This really was asking a lot from a visual symbol.

The RESEARCH

We began by first looking at the various players in the industry, categorising them into two main groups - similar sized companies and industry leaders. The first thing that caught our attention was the overwhelming industry wide trend towards Alphabetical names with simple typographical logo marks such as SNQS, PVH, VF, etc.

While the remaining companies had a problem with names that lacked any cultural relevancy such as Asmara or Li & Fung. This would of course make it easier for our new identity to stand out from the crowd.

The inspiration

After several meetings, questionnaires and conversations we began to get a feel for what the client was trying to create.

We began by listing out the qualities we wanted our logo mark to convey, brainstorming and sketching out several ideas on paper. We also simultaneously, worked on coming up with names for each concept.

image
Concept one - drapr

We began by creating a brush styled typographical based logo which was delightfully indulgent and artful while still appearing professional.

As for the name, we picked Drapr, from the old english term, ‘Draper’. Sometimes referred to as cloth merchants, Drapers were an important trade guild during the medieval period and operated cloth wholesale import export businesses.

This concept fit perfectly with the client’s business. And shortening the name to Drapr made it distinctive as well as making life easier when it came to securing a Domain name for their website.

concept two - ARCHR

While sketching out several generic shapes, I began to notice a visual similarity between clothes hangers and recurved bows used in archery.

By combining the shapes, I created a stylistic bow and arrow, replacing the arrow head with a hanger’s hook. Next, I modified the arrow’s fletching’s to hint at a stitching pattern at the bottom part of the logo.

For the typeface I selected Didot, a clean and efficient modernist serif created by frenchman, Firmin Didot in 1784. It is known for its hairline thin serifs and its high contrast giving it a Minimal, Efficient and Modern look.

image
Concept THREE - WINDHM

During colonial times, the East Indiamen were the largest merchant ships used by the British to transport tea, spices and cloth.

One of the most notable of these was the East Indiaman - Windham (Windhm). It sailed 6 major voyages around the globe to India and China, was twice captured by the French and recaptured by the British. Defying the trend of those times, the ship was never sunk or wrecked and was eventually sold to the Chilean Government in 1818. It was renamed Lautaro, refitted and heroically went on to help the Chileans win several battles against similarly sized Spanish vessels.

Sketching out several versions of the ship, I realised the resulting graphics, although pleasing to the eye, were too detailed for an effective logo. However, angling the ship at a slant and using incomplete lines to form an impression enabled me to reduce the logo form to its bare essentials.

Following our approach with the previous identities, I shortened the name to ‘Windhm’, using Bodoni, another semi-modern Serif font created by the Italian Typographer, Giambattista Bodoni just after Frenchman Firmin Didot in the late 1790s.

image
final Concept - stitch & hue

My ultimate goal with each logo mark is to visually capture the personality of my client’s business in a creative and memorable way.

In this case, the start up’s two most important qualities were their manufacturing expertise and their strong network of business relationships.

The solution was obvious - I incorporated the cross stitch pattern from the Archr logo mark, using it to connect two simple recognisable words - Stich & Hue. We then added a soft gradient to add some flamboyance and personality to the mark.

After trying out several typeface combinations, we finally settled on two type families.

The first one was Hipstelvetica, a quirky typeface created by José Filipe Gomes, based on the classic Helvetica type family created in 1957 by Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger with input from Eduard Hoffmann.

The second alternative was Jaapokki, a modern minimal Sans Serif Typeface created by a Finnish Designer Mikko Nuuttila. The stroke weight matched the thickness of the strokes in our symbol perfectly. Moreover, the S arched gently to line up with the closest stroke. This ensured the two letters and the symbol worked together perfectly.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
The RESULTS

The geometrical characteristic of the logo translated well across media, making it possible to animate it creatively online as well as enabling the client to stitch it into their apparel and print it on their packaging. After reviewing several colour gradient options from a minimalistic grey to a dynamic yellow to orange hue, the client settled on a soft purple to orange gradient. The purple tones create a sense of luxury, depth and creativity while the soft orange tones add a bit of optimism and warmth to the visual.

© KP-DESIGN 2016